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Your Rehearsal Dinner

This is an opportunity to say thank you to family and friends who’ve participated in the planning process.

While you may be feeling overwhelmed at the thought of having to plan yet one more party prior to your big day, this one is worth the effort. It is the best opportunity to relax and say thank you for everything that your friends and family have contributed to your wedding planning process.
What is a Rehearsal Dinner?

Your rehearsal dinner is the dinner/celebration following your ceremony rehearsal at your church, synagogue, temple or fellowship. It can be a fancy dinner at an upscale eatery or you can opt for a backyard barbecue at home. Really the sky’s the limit and you can be as creative as you want. The dinner is primarily a party to spend some needed time with close friends and family before the wedding so making it a very informal affair is best.

Who gets invited to this pre-party?

Invite your entire wedding party and their significant others, children attendants and their parents, your officiant and his or her spouse and your immediate family. It is not required for you to invite out of town guests to this celebration but it is highly recommended. Your out of town guests will feel more welcomed when they are included in your festivities and it will give them a chance to meet the other important people in your life in a more intimate informal setting. If there are too many out of towners to accommodate try holding a different kind of party for them like a day after the wedding breakfast or brunch. Try to limit your guest list so that this party doesn’t take on a life of it’s own, you don’t want to upstage the main event. 10-25 guests are average for this type of party.

More gifts to give here, too?

Well this time it is gifts from the bride and groom and not necessarily for the bride and groom. This is the party where the bride and groom show their gratitude for all the help support and caring that has been contributed during the wedding planning process. Gifts should be given to each bridesmaid and each groomsmen for taking the time, energy and finances to be part of the wedding. And a gift would be fitting for anyone else who played an instrumental role in your wedding planning. Though this may be a time for the best man to hand the groom his personal gift or the maid of honor may have a token for the bride it is not required of them.

Toasting your loved ones with a thank you is also appropriate here. Ideally the couple should stand up together to toast and thank everyone who is present for being involved in the wedding especially the future in-laws. After these thank-yous have been made the bride and groom should offer the floor to anyone else who would like to make a toast.

Though traditionally the groom’s parents host this soiree, these days it can be handled by both sets of parents or by the couple themselves. Sometimes this is the chance for the groom’s mother to show off her pride and joy, but it may not be as important as you think. Talk it over with your future in-laws and decide who handles this affair early on to avoid any payment or hosting conflicts.

Planning Tips:

Limit your guest list so that this party doesn’t take on a life of it’s own.

Don’t forget to invite your Officiant, Minister or Rabbi.

Stand up as a couple to thank your parents and guests for participating in your wedding planning.

Discuss this party early on to avoid payment or hosting conflicts.

If you’re looking for additional information and last minute ideas, you should attend one of the ever-popular BrideWord Expos. BrideWorld hosts events where you can meet with dozens upon dozens of wedding professionals face-to-face, who have the experience to answer your toughest questions.

This is an opportunity to say thank you to family and friends who’ve participated in the planning process.

While you may be feeling overwhelmed at the thought of having to plan yet one more party prior to your big day, this one is worth the effort. It is the best opportunity to relax and say thank you for everything that your friends and family have contributed to your wedding planning process.

What is a Rehearsal Dinner?

Your rehearsal dinner is the dinner/celebration following your ceremony rehearsal at your church, synagogue, temple or fellowship. It can be a fancy dinner at an upscale eatery or you can opt for a backyard barbecue at home. Really the sky’s the limit and you can be as creative as you want. The dinner is primarily a party to spend some needed time with close friends and family before the wedding so making it a very informal affair is best.

Who gets invited to this pre-party?

Invite your entire wedding party and their significant others, children attendants and their parents, your officiant and his or her spouse and your immediate family. It is not required for you to invite out of town guests to this celebration but it is highly recommended. Your out of town guests will feel more welcomed when they are included in your festivities and it will give them a chance to meet the other important people in your life in a more intimate informal setting. If there are too many out of towners to accommodate try holding a different kind of party for them like a day after the wedding breakfast or brunch. Try to limit your guest list so that this party doesn’t take on a life of it’s own, you don’t want to upstage the main event. 10-25 guests are average for this type of party.

More gifts to give here, too?

Well this time it is gifts from the bride and groom and not necessarily for the bride and groom. This is the party where the bride and groom show their gratitude for all the help support and caring that has been contributed during the wedding planning process. Gifts should be given to each bridesmaid and each groomsmen for taking the time, energy and finances to be part of the wedding. And a gift would be fitting for anyone else who played an instrumental role in your wedding planning. Though this may be a time for the best man to hand the groom his personal gift or the maid of honor may have a token for the bride it is not required of them.

Toasting your loved ones with a thank you is also appropriate here. Ideally the couple should stand up together to toast and thank everyone who is present for being involved in the wedding especially the future in-laws. After these thank-yous have been made the bride and groom should offer the floor to anyone else who would like to make a toast.

Though traditionally the groom’s parents host this soiree, these days it can be handled by both sets of parents or by the couple themselves. Sometimes this is the chance for the groom’s mother to show off her pride and joy, but it may not be as important as you think. Talk it over with your future in-laws and decide who handles this affair early on to avoid any payment or hosting conflicts.

Planning Tips:

Limit your guest list so that this party doesn’t take on a life of it’s own.

Don’t forget to invite your Officiant, Minister or Rabbi.

Stand up as a couple to thank your parents and guests for participating in your wedding planning.

Discuss this party early on to avoid payment or hosting conflicts.

If you’re looking for additional information and last minute ideas, you should attend one of the ever-popular BrideWord Expos. BrideWorld hosts events where you can meet with dozens upon dozens of wedding professionals face-to-face, who have the experience to answer your toughest questions.

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